Southern Explorations

 

National Geographic Adventure Magazine - Best Adventure Travel Companies on Earth 2009

TRIPS BY ACTIVITY

 


 
© 2005-2014
World Wide Explorations, Inc.
 
Website design and programming
TerraRhythm
Media for Vibrant Change

Squirrel Monkeys of Costa Rica

Central American Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri oerstedii) at Manuel Antonio National Park, Costa Rica.

Central American Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri oerstedii) at Manuel Antonio National Park, Costa Rica.

Of the five species of squirrel monkeys, only one, the Central American squirrel monkey, is found as far north as Costa Rica. During their travel to Costa Rica, visitors may see two subspecies of the Central American squirrel monkey, both of which inhabit lowland forests of the southern Pacific coast and are difficult to distinguish. The rarer of the two subspecies inhabits areas further south.

Return to Previous Page

Squirrel Monkeys of Costa Rica

Squirrel monkeys subsist on mostly insects though when available will dine on an eclectic diet, ranging from fruit to small birds. Fortunately for visitors on Costa Rica tours wishing to catch a glimpse of the species, the Central American squirrel monkey is active during the day, though it stays in the trees. Foraging comprises much of its waking hours during the dry season when food is scarcer. The species may travel in groups of up to seventy-five but usually smaller, especially when foraging, and not always composed of the same individuals.
Slightly smaller in stature than the capuchin, the squirrel monkey weighs just one to three pounds. It grows to about a foot tall with a tail as long as or longer than its body that it uses to balance itself. Living in the bio-diverse habitat of rainforest canopy, squirrel monkeys must evade a variety of predators, including big cats such as the jaguars, birds of prey and snakes. Though it may be tricky to capture this active species in photographs, the antics of the petite squirrel monkey are very entertaining to watch for those visitors lucky enough to see them on rainforest excursions during travel to Costa Rica.
Deforestation and hunting as pet or pest have drastically decreased the populations of Costa Rica’s squirrel monkeys. Scientists believe that only a few thousand of the species remain here. Conservation efforts have resulted in the species moving from a status of critically endangered to endangered. This improvement is the result of the government’s conservation measures and efforts by entities such as E.A.R.T.H. University, working to increase the use of sustainable rainforest farming practices that will aid the preservation of the species.
The two areas where visitors who travel to Costa Rica will be most likely to observe the species are on the Pacific coast in Manuel Antonio National Park and further south, on the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica’s largest national park, Corcovado. Six of Southern Explorations’ eight Costa Rica tours visit one or both of these parks.

SOUTHERN EXPLORATIONS
IS A PROUD
MEMBER / SPONSOR / AWARDEE OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANIZATIONS

The International Ecotourism Society Leave No Trace American Whitewater Ecuadoran Rivers Institute Adventure Travel Trade Association KEXP 90.3FM Seattle International Galapagos Tour Operators Association Washington Wilderness Coalition Headwaters Institute La Pagina en la Puerta (The Page in the Door) Cascadia Wildlands Project
International Rivers
National Geographic Adventure Magazine - Best Adventure Travel Companies on Earth 2009 National Geographic Traveler -  Tours of a Lifetime 2011 World Wildlife Fund - 50 years of environmental conservation

CONTACT US

CALL
1.877.784.5400
TOLL FREE
OUTSIDE
THE U.S.A. CALL
1.206.784.8111

RELATED TRAVEL ARTICLES

New World Monkeys of Costa Rica
New World Monkeys of Costa Rica
Capuchin Monkeys of Costa Rica
Howler Monkeys of Costa Rica
Spider Monkeys of Costa Rica
Squirrel Monkeys of Costa Rica
New World Monkeys of Panama
New World Monkeys of Panama
Capuchin Monkeys of Panama
Howler Monkeys of Panama
Spider Monkeys of Panama
Squirrel Monkeys of Panama