Futaleufu MultiSport

  • Overview
  • Itinerary
  • Dates/Pricing
  • Accommodations
  • Maps
  • Photos & Video
  • Extensions
  • Testimonials
  • Physical Rating

Travel to Patagonia and discover the Futaleufu River! For sheer beauty and whitewater excitement, there are few rivers that rival Chile's pristine Futaleufu. This Patagonia tour is located in the heart of Patagonia, the Futaleufu River is renowned as one of the best whitewater opportunities in the world. This thrilling Patagonia trip combines Class III, IV and V rafting with classic Patagonia hiking, bicycling, yoga, kayaking, horseback riding and many other outdoor pursuits enhanced by plush, luxury camping. Enjoy the breathtaking beauty of the area, while top rafting guides navigate through the legendary rapids of the Futaleufu. Each night you'll return to the exotic treat of fully-equipped campsites featuring a hot tub, sauna, massage studio, and gourmet meals. This is a world-class, once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Camp - 5 star camping on the Futaleufu

A note on weather:
One may experience many different weather patterns in the Futaleufú River valley including frequent storms off the Pacific. This also means that the river level can change dramatically if an unseasonable tormenta, or rain storm, passes through. We raft only on days when the river is at a safe level. The sunny months are usually December through March.


 

Chile

Traveling to this Location

Passport and visa requirements
A valid passport is required to enter and leave Chile. A visa is not required for citizens of the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and most Western European countries, if visiting for less than 90 days. It is the passenger's responsibility to check with local immigration offices or the Chilean consulate prior to travel to determine up-to-date entry requirements. For more information see www.americanpassport.com or www.chile-usa.org

Immunizations
The following vaccinations are recommended when visiting any area of Chile:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Tetanus-diphtheria and measles (as needed booster doses)
  • Typhoid

The Centers for Disease Control provides immunization information for travel in Latin America. www.cdc.gov

Customs
Entry During the flight to Santiago, a flight attendant distributes a Chile entrance form to all passengers. At Customs, travelers are asked to show the completed form along with their passport and are asked how many days they plan to be in Chile. Normally, the passport will be stamped, indicating a permissible stay of 90 days, renewable for another 90 days. A copy of the Customs form will be returned to the traveler.
When arriving by air, US citizens must pay a reciprocity fee of $100US (cash or credit card accepted) which is considered a multiple entry visa valid for the life of the passport. The Chilean government levies this fee in response to one levied by the US for processing visas for Chilean nationals. Canadians pay a $55US entry fee, payable in cash or credit card, also valid for the life of the passport; and Australians $30US, payable in cash and valid for 90 days. There is no fee for EU or New Zealand residents.
Exit There is a departure tax of $30US on international flights and $8US for domestic flights.

Exchanging currency
The Peso is the official currency of Chile. Current exchange rate information is available on our website under "Traveler Information." Visa and MasterCard are the most recognized credit cards in Chile. American Express is less widely accepted. ATM machines (Visa/MasterCard/Cirrus/Plus), with directions in English, are widely available 24 hours a day in all major cities and large towns providing a convenient and economical way to obtain pesos. Hotels exchange money, and most offer safe-keeping for valuables. On trips of two weeks or less, we recommend carrying only US cash in $20 denominations to exchange as needed. Before departure, we send booked passengers a packet of trip information that contains operating hours for money exchange offices (Casas de Cambio) and more money tips.

Using electricity
In all of Chile, the electricity is 220 volts and 50 cycles. To use 110-volt American-made electrical appliances in Chile (for a hairdryer or to recharge digital camera batteries, etc.), bring plug adapters and a voltage transformer. For video cameras, we suggest packing an extra set of charged batteries.
 

Weather
When to Visit
  • jan
  • feb
  • mar
  • apr
  • may
  • jun
  • jul
  • aug
  • sep
  • oct
  • nov
  • dec

Santiago & Surrounding Vineyards - The fertile heartland, this midland area of Chile enjoys a Mediterranean climate, with maximum temperatures averaging 82°F (28°C) in January and 50°F (10°C) in July. The rainy season lasts from May to August. Evenings and nights can be cool, even during the summer.

General Patagonia - The area south of Puerto Montt and Chiloé covers about 30% of the total land area of Chile. It is a rugged, mountainous region of tremendous beauty. Westerly winds and storms often drop enormous amounts of snow and rain on the seaward slopes. In the Magellanes and Tierra del Fuego areas, temperatures in summer average 52°F (11°C). Dampness and wind chill can make it feel cooler so layered clothing and good waterproof gear are musts. The weather year-round is highly unpredictable, and in summer be prepared for incessant winds that lessen in the winter. In the shoulder season months, November and March, winds are not likely to be as strong as during the peak of summer.

Torres Del Paine - The weather is famously unpredictable in this area and it is possible to experience four seasons in the course of a few hours. Average daily temperatures vary but in summer one can expect temperatures ranging between 50° F (10° C) and 70° F (20 ° C) with the occasional hot day of 78° F (25° C). Temperatures can drop to zero at night, and high winds are common in this area. Travelers should be prepared (both mentally and physically) for unpredictable and sometimes challenging weather conditions and pack accordingly. Good head-to-toe, breathable waterproof clothing is essential.

SANTIAGO

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 54-85 0.0
FEB 54-84 0.1
MAR 52-80 0.2
APR 47-72 0.5
MAY 40-64 2.3
JUN 40-58 3.1
JUL 37-57 3.0
AUG 38-61 2.1
SEP 40-65 1.1
OCT 45-71 0.5
NOV 47-77 0.2
DEC 51-82 0.2

*Year Round Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

PUERTO MONTT

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 48-66 3.6
FEB 47-67 3.7
MAR 47-64 3.9
APR 43-60 5.6
MAY 42-56 9.2
JUN 39-51 8.8
JUL 37-50 9.0
AUG 38-52 8.2
SEP 38-52 5.7
OCT 38-52 4.8
NOV 43-60 0.5
DEC 46-63 4.1

*Year Round Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

PUNTA ARENAS

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 43-57 1.4
FEB 44-57 1.1
MAR 51-54 1.6
APR 39-49 1.6
MAY 35-44 1.7
JUN 31-39 1.3
JUL 29-38 1.3
AUG 31-41 1.3
SEP 32-46 1.1
OCT 36-50 0.9
NOV 40-53 1.1
DEC 42-56 1.2

*Year Round Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

SAN PEDRO ATACAMA

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 50-76 0.9
FEB 50-75 0.2
MAR 48-73 0.1
APR 44-70 0.1
MAY 38-66 0.0
JUN 33-61 0.0
JUL 33-61 0.0
AUG 35-64 0.0
SEP 40-69 0.1
OCT 43-72 0.1
NOV 46-74 0.1
DEC 48-75 0.1

*Year Round Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

EASTER ISLAND

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 68-81 2.8
FEB 68-81 3.3
MAR 68-80 3.8
APR 66-77 4.8
MAY 64-74 6.0
JUN 62-72 4.2
JUL 60-70 4.1
AUG 60-70 3.7
SEP 60-71 3.4
OCT 61-73 2.7
NOV 63-75 2.9
DEC 65-78 3.4

*Year Round Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

FAQ
Q: How safe is Chile?
A: Chile, especially in the Patagonian region is one of the safest countries to visit in Latin America. As long as there is poverty, theft will be a reality of life for citizens and visitors in South America. Travelers should take the same precautions that they would while traveling elsewhere. Listen to the advice of your guide and hotel reception staff and take common sense precautions such as not going into unfamiliar areas alone, especially at night. Use the safety deposit box at your hotel for your passport and extra money (carry only as much as you might spend) and leave jewelry and expensive watches at home.
Q: When will I receive the airline tickets (or vouchers) included in the trip?
A: Airline tickets will either be given to you at the airport or the hotel the morning of your departure, or in the case of e-tickets, will be provided when you present your passport at check-in.
Q: What are the guides’ qualifications?
A: Our exceptional guides have been carefully selected for their knowledge, professionalism, experience and ability to effectively manage groups with finesse. We hire only guides who are native to the destination and are licensed and/or certified in accordance with the government regulations of their country. All of our Chile guides are fluent in Spanish and English, and some also speak indigenous languages. Most have advanced degrees in tourism, biology, native culture or another related field. Our congenial guides offer priceless insights into the true nature of their homelands, adding immeasurably to the enjoyment of the trip.
Q: What are the meals like?
A: Chile is famous for its seafood, prepared simply or in hearty soups and stews, and its premium red and white wines. Beef and chicken are staples, and vegetarian alternatives may have to be requested in restaurants. Among its national dishes are choclo, a beef and chicken pie topped with a basil-seasoned corn mixture and baked in a clay pot, parotos, a bean vegetable dish, and cazuela, a stew of chicken or beef. Empanadas (fried or baked dough filled with meat or fruit) and humitas (a version of the tamale made of corn dough often mixed with onion) are popular as snack foods. Patagonia’s estancias are well known for their quality restaurants where both Chilean and international dishes are found on the menu. Wine and beer are available at a reasonable cost throughout the trip. The restaurants in Patagonia’s refugios (shelters) offer a lively atmosphere and wholesome Chilean and international cuisine including vegetarian fare. Breakfast includes toast, coffee, cereal, ham, cheese, bread, rolls, juice and occasionally eggs.
Q: How do we get from one tour destination to another?
A: In Chile, we use a mix of private and public transportation to get travelers to their destinations safely and efficiently. This includes local air carriers, private vans and cars, comfortable tourist buses, boats, etc.
Q: Can I extend my stay?
A: We offer exciting half-day and full-day Santiago extension tours to add on to either end of your Chile trip. We also offer extensions in the wine country, Patagonia, San Pedro de Atacama, Lake District and the mysterious Easter Island.
Q: Are meals included?
A: We try to balance flexibility and convenience regarding meals. Meals are included on tour days spent off the beaten path where restaurant choices are limited. In the major towns with a wide variety of restaurants, meals are generally not included to allow our travelers to make their own dining choices. On these days, your hotel will provide a light continental breakfast. Your local guide will be a wealth of information about great restaurant options and is usually available to accompany groups that wish to eat together.
Q: How much should I budget for tips?
A: Tipping is a personal matter, and passengers are encouraged to tip what they feel is appropriate. Please refer to our tipping section.
Q: Who travels on your group trips?
A: While travelers of varying ages from all over the world take our trips, most are Americans between ages 20 and 60. The more rigorous itineraries tend to attract slightly younger travelers than our other trips.
Q: What is the average group size on the scheduled trips?
A: We operate our scheduled group trips with a minimum of two and a maximum of eight to twelve passengers, depending on the itinerary. This policy minimizes our environmental impact, allows us to travel to areas less visited and makes the sightseeing experience more personal. It gives our guides sufficient time to attend to the individual needs of each visitor. Traveling in small groups also increases the likelihood of encountering wildlife in some areas.
Q: How much driving is involved?
A: Patagonia is a vast area, and some long travel days of 5-6 hours can be expected. This is especially true on trips that visit both Chile and Argentina. Short drives of around 1 hour or so to enter a park or to visit a highlight of the trip are more common.
Q: If I need to bring extra luggage with me to South America, where can it be stored?
A: On all of our Patagonia trips, we store your extra luggage and place it in a van for your final transfer out. Excess luggage may be stored in the hotel where your trip begins or at our operator’s offices. Luggage may not be stored at the airport.
Q: Do I need a converter/ adaptor for the electricity?
A: Electricity in Chile is 220 volts, 50 cycles. For American-made electrical appliances, it will be necessary to use a voltage converter but no adapter since electrical outlets are like those in the U.S. For video cameras, we suggest packing an extra set of charged batteries. Please note, some hotels have hair dryers for guest use, but most do not.
Q: How will I do laundry during the trip?
A: Patagonian hotels charge very affordable rates for doing a guest’s laundry. You will also have access to laundry facilities on most days in major cities. Some of the Patagonian experiences will be true ‘wilderness’ style camping with only a river or lake as a water supply. Some locations have washing facilities where guests may do laundry. Bring biodegradable soap if you wish to do your own laundry. Please refer to the full itinerary or contact us for details.
Q: Will I be able to use my cell phone?
A: Each company is different. Check with your cell phone provider for the most up-to-date information. Cell phone coverage in Patagonia is very limited. The estancias have radios for emergencies, and some are equipped with satellite phones. Unless you make arrangements in advance, you will likely find telephone and texting charges are high. In remote areas, cell phone coverage may be limited.
Q: I’ve heard Patagonia is very remote. What if I have a medical emergency on the trip?
A: Some of our trips take passengers into some primitive wilderness areas. Our guides are trained in wilderness first-aid. To ensure the safety of our travelers, our guides are linked with outside services 24 hours a day in all locations to provide assistance when necessary. Though our guides carry extensive first aid equipment for minor ailments, injuries and accidents, they cannot handle serious medical conditions, and passengers are advised to obtain health or travel insurance that covers medical evacuation. There are small hospitals in the Patagonia region, some with 24-hour medical assistance that can deal with minor injuries and illnesses. In the rare event of an accident or broken bone, passengers would be evacuated from the wilderness area (probably by horse) and continue on the long drive out. Helicopters are available for emergencies but cannot fly during high winds. Any passengers with a medical condition or using medication should discuss this with us prior to travel.
Q: What is the best way to get money on the trip?
A: The Peso (CHP) is the official currency of Chile. Major credit cards are widely accepted at hotels and restaurants in major cities and in some smaller towns throughout Chile. Traveler’s Checks, for exchange purposes, are accepted at only a few locations, and not worth the hassle. ATM machines, with instructions in English, are widely available in all major cities and large towns though not 24-hours a day. Nonetheless, ATM machines are the most convenient and economical way to obtain pesos using a Plus VISA or Cirrus MasterCard without having to carry around excess cash. Hotels exchange money, and most offer safe-keeping for valuables. On trips of two weeks or less, we suggest carrying only US cash. Cash is easier and more convenient to exchange, and the rate of exchange is generally better than Traveler's Checks. As in other Latin American countries, getting change from large-denomination bills is often problematic. Store US$20 bills in a money belt to exchange as needed. When not in transit, keep the money belt in a locked compartment in luggage, duffel or backpack at the hotel.

Argentina

Traveling to this Location

Passport and visa requirements
A valid passport is required to enter and leave Argentina. At this time, a visa is not required for citizens of the US, the European Community and Latin American countries if visiting for less than 90 days. Citizens of Argentina's neighbouring countries only need their identification card to cross the border. Citizens of other countries should check with the Argentine consulate or embassy. A 90-day entry permit, renewable for another 90 days, is issued to all travelers on entering the country. It is the passenger's responsibility to check with local immigration offices or the Argentine consulate prior to departure for current entrance requirements. For more information see www.americanpassport.com or www.embajadaargentina.eeuu.org

If visiting Iguazu Falls: Passengers wishing to arrange a trip extension to Iguazu Falls are encouraged to make visa arrangements before departure. The falls extend into Brazil, and most people wish to view the falls close-up from the Argentine side as well as in their full splendor from a distance on the Brazilian side. To enter Brazil from Argentina, one must obtain a Brazilian visa (at a cost of $100US payable in pesos if purchased in Argentina) even if only traveling to the country for the day. This is most easily and more reliably arranged before arriving at the falls. Further information is available on the website of the Brazilian embassy in Buenos Aires: www.conbrasil.org.ar

Immunizations
The following vaccinations are recommended when visiting any area of Argentina:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Typhoid
  • Tetanus-diphtheria, polio and measles (as needed booster doses)

If traveling to the north and northwestern areas of the country including Izuazu Falls, a Yellow Fever vaccination is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
The CDC also recommends taking a prescription anti-malarial medication if traveling along the border areas of Bolivia and Paraguay.
The Centers for Disease Control provides immunization information for travel in Latin America. www.cdc.gov

Customs
Entry During the flight to Buenos Aires, a flight attendant distributes an Argentina entrance form to all passengers. At Customs, travelers are asked to show the completed form along with their passport, and are asked how many days they plan to be in Argentina. Normally, the passport will be stamped indicating a permissible stay of 90 days and a copy of the Customs form will be returned to the traveler.
Exit The customs document must be presented when exiting the country. Passengers departing from Buenos Aires' Ezeiza International Airport on an international flight are charged a departure tax of $18US (payable in pesos, US dollars, or a combination of both). Domestic airport departure taxes per person are $9US at most airports; $18US at El Calafate; and $13US at Ushuaia and Trelew.

Reciprocity Fee
Travelers from the US, Canada and Australia are required to pay a Reciprocity Fee upon entering Argentina. The Reciprocity Fee is payable by US dollars, Argentine Pesos, or credit card and is based on the cost for an Argentine citizen to obtain a visa upon entering the respective country:
US: US$160 (valid for the life of the passport)
Canada: US$ 70 (Single Entry)
Australia: US$ 100 (Single Entry)

Exchanging currency
The Peso is the official currency of Argentina. Current exchange rate information is available on our website under "Traveler Information." Currency can be confusing in Argentina because the $ symbol denotes Argentine Pesos. US Dollars are represented by U$S, US$ or USD. When discussing costs, it is important to be specific. Cash is the accepted form of currency in most places except in city restaurants and stores where credit cards can normally be used. In some places, photo ID is required when using a credit card. Though some places accept US dollars, it is advisable to carry cash in pesos, especially when travelling to small cities or remote areas. Major credit cards are widely accepted in major cities and in some smaller towns. Traveller's Checks are only rarely accepted even in major cities and not worth the hassle. ATM machines, with instructions in English, are widely available 24 hours a day in all major cities and large towns, providing a convenient end economical way to obtain pesos. On trips of 2 weeks or less, we recommend carrying only US cash in $20US denominations to exchange as needed. Hotels exchange money, and most offer safe-keeping for valuables. Before departure, we send booked passengers a packet of trip information that contains operating hours for money exchange offices (Casas de Cambio) and more money tips.

Using electricity
In all of Argentina, the electricity is 220 volts and 50 cycles. To use 110-volt American-made electrical appliances in Argentina (for a hairdryer or to recharge digital camera batteries, etc.), bring plug adapters and a voltage transformer. For video cameras, we suggest packing an extra set of charged batteries.
For questions about our trips to the Argentina side of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, please see Frequently asked Questions about our Trips to Patagonia.

Weather
When to Visit
  • jan
  • feb
  • mar
  • apr
  • may
  • jun
  • jul
  • aug
  • sep
  • oct
  • nov
  • dec

Due to the country's geography and location, Argentina & Patagonia offers a wide variety of climates. The Argentine mainland is mostly temperate, with seasons reversed from those in the northern hemisphere. The northern areas of Salta and around Iguazú are tropical, while southern Patagonia's weather is often cold and windy and always unpredictable.

Winter (from the end of June to the beginning of October) may be cold with some rain in certain areas of Argentina, while the Northwest enjoys sunny days and warm temperatures.

Summer (from December to March) is hot and sometimes humid in Buenos Aires; warm and dry in the Northwest with intermittent summer rains; and cold but sunny and sometimes windy in Patagonia.
 

BUENOS AIRES

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 69-83 3.9
FEB 67-81 4.2
MAR 67-78 4.9
APR 58-71 3.5
MAY 53-65 2.8
JUN 47-58 2.2
JUL 47-58 2.4
AUG 48-61 2.6
SEP 51-64 2.6
OCT 56-70 4.4
NOV 61-76 4.1
DEC 66-81 3.8
*Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

EL CALAFATE

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 45-65 0.5
FEB 42-65 0.3
MAR 37-61 0.5
APR 32-54 1.0
MAY 28-45 1.2
JUN 27-41 0.8
JUL 29-39 1.0
AUG 33-43 0.8
SEP 44-50 0.6
OCT 37-56 0.5
NOV 41-61 0.4
DEC 44-64 0.6

*Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

USHUAIA

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 41-57 1.5
FEB 51-56 1.8
MAR 39-54 2.1
APR 36-49 2.2
MAY 32-43 2.1
JUN 29-40 1.9
JUL 28-39 1.4
AUG 30-42 1.8
SEP 32-46 1.6
OCT 36-50 1.4
NOV 38-53 1.4
DEC 40-56 1.7

*Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

BARILOCHE

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 43-70 0.9
FEB 42-71 0.9
MAR 39-66 1.2
APR 35-58 2.1
MAY 33-50 5.3
JUN 30-44 5.5
JUL 29-43 5.1
AUG 30-46 4.6
SEPT 31-51 2.3
OCT 34-57 1.5
NOV 38-63 1.0
DEC 41-67 1.3

*Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

MENDOZA

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 64-90 1.4
FEB 62-87 1.3
MAR 57-81 1.1
APR 50-74 0.5
MAY 42-66 0.2
JUN 35-60 0.2
JUL 35-59 0.3
AUG 38-65 0.1
SEP 70-43 0.3
OCT 51-77 0.4
NOV 57-84 0.6
DEC 63-88 1.0

*Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches

 

SALTA

Min-Max Air Temp

Avg Rainfall

JAN 61-81 7.0
FEB 61-79 6.4
MAR 59-77 4.6
APR 54-73 1.4
MAY 46-70 0.3
JUN 39-66 0.1
JUL 37-68 0.2
AUG 39-72 0.2
SEP 45-75 0.8
OCT 52-79 1.0
NOV 57-81 2.5
DEC 61-82 5.4

*Temperatures in °F, Rainfall in Inches


 

 

 

FAQ
Q: How safe is Argentina?
A: Argentina (and especially the Patagonian region) is one of the safest countries to visit in Latin America. Travelers should take the same precautions that they would while traveling elsewhere. Listen to the advice of your guide and hotel reception staff and take common sense precautions such as not going into unfamiliar areas alone, especially at night. Use the safety deposit box at your hotel for your passport and extra money (carry only as much as you might spend) and leave jewelry and expensive watches at home. Current safety information can be obtained from www.travel.state.gov
Q: When will I receive the airline tickets (or vouchers) included in the trip?
A: Airline tickets will either be given to you at the airport or the hotel the morning of your departure, or in the case of e-tickets, will be provided when you present your passport at check-in.
Q: What are the guides’ qualifications?
A: To provide our Argentina passengers the most authentic experience possible, we contract with regional travel services and local Argentina guides. Due to the size and complexity of travel in Argentina, it is our policy to hire regional guides instead of assigning the same guide or a western tour leader to accompany passengers for the duration of the trip. This ensures that our passengers are always in the hands of knowledgeable guides who know their destinations intimately. All are fluent in Spanish and English and are licensed and/ or certified in accordance with the government regulations in each destination.
Q: Are meals included?
A: We try to balance flexibility and convenience regarding meals. Meals are included on tour days spent off the beaten path where restaurant choices are limited. In the major towns with a wide variety of restaurants, meals are generally not included to allow our travelers to make their own dining choices. On these days, your hotel will provide a light continental breakfast. Your local guide is a wealth of information about great restaurant options and is usually available to accompany groups that wish to eat together.
Q: What are the meals like?
A: There are over 6,000 restaurants, cafes and bars in Buenos Aires alone. The country’s vast agricultural regions, ranches and fishing areas make Argentina a diner’s delight, especially when sampling its grilled meats and quality wines. In hotels, estancias and hosterias, meals are eaten in the restaurant or with the establishment’s family. Dinner consists of lamb, beef, chicken or salmon with fresh vegetables or salad accompanied by rice or potatoes.
Q: Are you able to accommodate special dietary requests?
A: We can accommodate any diet. If you require a special diet (vegetarian, vegan, diabetic, etc.) or allergic to any foods and did not indicate your needs on the trip application at the time of booking, please trips that visit both Chile and Argentina. Short drives of around 1 hour or so to enter a park or to visit a highlight of other areas of Argentina are more common.
Q: How do we get from one tour destination to another?
A: In Argentina, we use a mix of private and public transportation to get travelers to their destinations safely and efficiently. This includes local air carriers, private vans and cars, comfortable tourist buses, boats, etc.
Q: Can I extend my stay?
A: We offer many exciting extensions in Buenos Aires, Iguazú, Bariloche and other areas of Argentina to add on to either end of your main trip. Contact us for more details.
Q: How much should I budget for tips?
A: Tipping is a personal matter, and guests are encouraged to tip what they feel is appropriate. See the pre-departure information for our tipping suggestions.
Q: Who travels on your group trips to Argentina?
A: Travelers of varying ages from all over the world take our trips. The more rigorous itineraries tend to attract slightly younger travelers than our other trips.
Q: What’s the average group size on the scheduled trips?
A: We operate our scheduled group trips with a minimum of two and a maximum of eight guests. This policy minimizes our environmental impact, allows us to travel to areas less visited and makes the sightseeing experience more personal. It allows our guides sufficient time to attend to the individual needs of each visitor. Traveling in small groups also increases the likelihood of encountering wildlife in some areas.
Q: Do I need a converter/adaptor for the electricity?
A: Argentina uses 220 volt, 50 cycle electricity. You will need a voltage converter for 110 volt devices. Many electronics have built-in converters, so check your device before departure. Plugs are either two rounded prongs or three angled flat prongs (pictured), so we recommend bringing the appropriate adaptors. Please note, some hotels have hair dryers, but most do not.
Q: How will I do laundry during the trip?
A: Argentine hotels charge very affordable rates for doing a guest’s laundry. You will also have access to laundry facilities on most days in major cities.
Q: Will I be able to use my cell phone?
A: Each company is different. Check with your cell phone provider for the most up-to-date information. Cell phone coverage in Patagonia is very limited. The estancias have radios for emergencies and some are equipped with satellite phones.
Q: I’ve heard Patagonia is very remote. What if I have a medical emergency on the trip?
A: Our trips take passengers into some primitive wilderness areas. Though our guides carry extensive first aid equipment for minor ailments, injuries and accidents, they cannot handle serious medical conditions, and passengers are advised to obtain medical insurance that covers medical evacuation. In the Patagonia region, note that medical assistance is very basic in El Chalten and also at El Calafate. Passengers are usually transferred to Rio Gallegos or to Buenos Aires. Helicopters are not used, Clients are transferred by land to Rio Gallegos (four hours from El Calafate and eight hours from El Chalten) and then fly to Buenos Aires if necessary/possible.
Q: If I need to bring extra luggage with me to South America, where can it be stored?
A: On all of our trips, we store your extra luggage in our offices or hotel storage. Luggage will be transferred to you on your last day, if at the end of your trip you do not stay at the hotel where you left your luggage. On all of our Patagonia trips, we store your extra luggage and place it in the van for your final transfer out. Luggage may not be stored at the airport.
Q: What’s the best way to get money on the trip?
A: Argentina’s unit of currency is the peso. Current exchange rate information is available in the Travel Information section of our website. Some places accept US dollars. Expect local currency as change. Visa and MasterCard are the most recognized credit cards in Argentina. Please note that when using credit cards, merchants will often charge a transaction fee in order to cover their costs. ATM machines (Visa/MasterCard/ Cirrus/Plus), with directions in English, are a popular choice for exchanging currency at the official rate of exchange (user fees may apply). They debit your account; distribute the money in pesos and are widely available 24 hours a day in all major cities and large but not small towns. Cash is the accepted form of currency in most places except for city restaurants and stores where credit cards can normally be used. Keep cash in small denominations for miscellaneous and last minute purchases as well as to pay airport taxes. Traveler’s Checks are only rarely accepted. On trips of 2 weeks or less, we recommend carrying some US cash. In a money belt, store $20 bills to exchange as needed. When not in transit, keep the money belt in a locked compartment in luggage, duffel or backpack at the hotel. For other money tips, see pre-departure information section.
Futaleufu MultiSport
Day 1 ARRIVE BUENOS AIRES - BARILOCHE

Arrive in Buenos Aires, Argentina – transfer to domestic terminal for flight to Bariloche. Overnight at a local hotel by Lake Nahuel Huapi and enjoy a group welcome dinner. (D)

Day 2 BARILOCHE - FUTALEUFU

Beautiful drive 185 miles south through deep valleys and open pampas, passing the headwaters of the Futaleufu. Cross the border into Chile and arrive early afternoon at camp. Camp orientation, swim, hot tub, and welcome happy hour. (B,L,D)

Day 3 FUTALEUFU RIVER RAFTING – MUNDACA – PUENTE

Awaken to the warmth of the sun on the banks of the Fu and enjoy your first morning in camp where breakfast is served around 9 AM. A pre-breakfast yoga class is available on our customized yoga platform with river views. After a thorough safety briefing, the rafts will be launched from base camp, stopping at a safe 'eddy' a short distance downstream, to practice rescue drills and prepare to raft as a team. Your raft is headed by a highly-trained and instinctive river guide with ace kayaking safety skills, who guides the boat from a stern-mounted oar frame. Guiding with oars does not detract from the paddling experience and provides greater control in pointing the bow straight through bus-size holes and fifteen-foot high 'haystack' wave trains. In addition, the rafts are supported by safety kayakers and a cataraft to ensure a safe experience. This style is consistent with any high-volume river that has strong currents where rapids graded IV to V+ rage on. Welcome to the Futaleufú! The first section from camp down to Puente Futaleufú (the Futaleufú Bridge) is only six miles but offers more rapids per kilometer than anywhere else on the river. This non-stop fun is the perfect warm-up run. The rapids of note are El Cojín, the Cushion, and Mundaca, a local family name. A vehicle will be waiting at take-out for the twenty-minute ride back to camp. Those who would prefer a lower body workout to complement their paddling are welcome to run or mountain bike back to camp. At the base, go fly-fishing, try out a kayak, do yoga, nap in a hammock, enjoy the sauna, have a massage, go for a hike, play a game of chess or cards, or soak in the hot tub. A hot shower, either indoors or out, is a luxurious treat while camping in the remote wilderness of northern Patagonia. Of course, for the hardy, the river provides a refreshing dip for another memorable experience on your Chile tour. Try the (short) cliff jumping, too! Every late afternoon is Happy Hour with an open, hot tub side bar stocked with beer, wine, cocktails, soda and juice. Candlelight dinners featuring fresh locally-grown produce and delicious breads baked fresh daily by the neighbors are served in the open-air kitchen and dining area. After dinner, enjoy the campfire and the stars before retiring to your cozy tent on your private platform where the sound of the river will lull you to sleep. (B,L,D)  
**Please note that this is a suggested itinerary that can be adjusted based on river flows and traveler interests. There are ample activities from base camp to choose from!**

Day 4 FUTALEUFU RIVER RAFTING - MAS O MENOS - CASA DE PIEDRA

After breakfast and optional early morning yoga, you will launch your raft from camp following the same exciting route as yesterday to master your rhythm. You’ll break to have lunch on the river. This second day of your Chile rafting tour we’ll pass the Puente Futaleufú (yesterday’s take-out) and meet a big stomping continuous cascade of waves known as Mas o Menos, "More or Less". This is a good stepping stone towards the first true technical Class V rapid, Casa de Piedra (House of Rock) waiting around the next corner, which you'll have an opportunity to scout beforehand. It forms a series of water wheels that channel all of their fury into a final churning pit with a dragon's back highway through it; that is, if you hit it on line. The remaining rapids on today's trip are Class III and IV. If you have the energy and desire, you may again mountain bike back to camp. For everyone else, a vehicle will be waiting. Enjoy the rest of the day and get ready for yet another fabulous dinner and peaceful night riverside. (B,L,D)
**Please note that this is a suggested itinerary that can be adjusted based on river flows and traveler interests. There are ample activities from base camp to choose from!**

Day 5 RIO ESPOLON KAYAKING

After two days of mastering the raft together, today you learn how to navigate your own inflatable kayaks (or “rubber duckies” as they are endearingly known). Even for the river veteran, these inflatables are surprisingly fun and often a trip highlight. Lago Espolon, the source of the clear Rio Espolon Class II/III rapids offers the perfect learning opportunity to master your kayak with the help of your river guide and several safety kayakers. For those interested in trying out a hard shell, whitewater kayak this is the perfect place. Rio Espolon is a major tributary to the Futaleufu, where it meets right above the Inferno Canyon, your afternoon take-out. Return to base camp for another relaxing late afternoon filled with your choice of activities or a relaxing massage. (B,L,D)  
**Please note that this is a suggested itinerary that can be adjusted based on river flows and traveler interests. There are ample activities from base camp to choose from!**

Day 6 RIO AZUL VALLEY HORSEBACK RIDING - RIO AZUL KAYAKING

Today's horseback adventure travels deeper into the heart of Patagonia to the Rio Azul valley, where you’ll be surrounded by snowcapped peaks along an eight-mile trail paralleling the turquoise waters of the Rio Azul, with a stop for lunch along the way. Patagonia horses are quite the different variety--well-mannered but incredibly powerful work horses that are as mellow or as exciting as you would like to push. The local expert equestrians and our horse-ready river guide will lead you on an adventurous, three-hour ride. You stop for lunch and try paddling on the challenging Class III/IV Rio Azul for the afternoon. From the Rio Espolon, this is a sizeable step up in difficulty. Return to camp for Happy Hour at the sunset bar and the much deserved hot tub. (B,L,D) 
**Please note that this is a suggested itinerary that can be adjusted based on river flows and traveler interests. There are ample activities from base camp to choose from!**

Day 7 FUTALEUFU TOWN - RAFTING RIO ESPOLON - INFERNO CANYON!

After an early breakfast in camp, travel twenty-two miles up the road to visit the town of Futaleufú. You will have about an hour to stroll around this sleepy mountain town and its central plaza filled with fragrant rose bushes and cedar trees. This morning’s drop in is the Rio Espolon, a crystal-clear river that meanders for two miles before it flows into the Rio Futaleufú, one mile above the Inferno canyon. The upper canyon, where aggressive Class V paddling is required, is the most difficult section of whitewater on the river so we offer tamer river options for those who prefer a little less excitement. Five impressive rapids form a tight winding river passage creating an intense flow and the rushing adrenaline you dreamed of when you chose this Patagonia tour. Coming out of "Exit," the last of these rapids, you enter into a long calm of many miles, though the current remains swift. After a relaxing float, things pick back up at the ferocious Zeta rapid, where portage (walk around) is mandatory. There the crew will "ghost" boat the rafts through this treacherous rapid while you enjoy lunch on the rocks and the view of the crushing intensity of the rapid. The afternoon begins with "Throne Room," a Class V+ rapid for kayakers, a ghost boat rapid for rafts. Walking around this rapid notice an almost 'river wide' hole that could destroy a raft. Back on board, a continuous Class IV corridor of rapids doesn't let up until take-out at the Rio Azul footbridge. Here the rafts are left for the night, tethered onshore. Early evening is spent in camp getting ready for the evening festivities, a journey to the neighboring farm of Miguel Toro who at seventy years young is one of the most colorful and charming residents of the valley. At his Casa de Ti, his daughter, Blanca, and her partner, Umberto, will prepare a very special treat, a delicious Curanto dinner, the cuisine typical of the south of Chile and the island of Chiloe. (B,L,D)  
**Please note that this is a suggested itinerary that can be adjusted based on river flows and traveler interests. There are ample activities from base camp to choose from!**

Day 8 FUTALEUFU RIVER RAFTING - TERMINATOR - CASA DE PIEDRA

Today is the trip's peak on what is considered the best day of whitewater in the world, an unforgettable highlight of your Chile tour. After a wholesome breakfast, you head up river back to re-launch the crafts. Shortly downstream, the Rio Azul merges into the Fu and the river opens up offering breathtaking views of snowcapped peaks and the jagged ridges of the mountain called Las Tres Monjas ("The Three Nuns"). A four-mile stretch of warm-up rapids leads to "The Terminator," the longest and toughest of the rapids of the trip. After scouting and studying your line, you'll take the plunge and drop in to three miles of non-stop, exhilarating rapids. After this aerobic workout, the “Himalayas,” a mammoth haystack wave train, await. River calm returns, offering a gentle float into lunch served at base camp. The afternoon is yours to decide. For the river addicts, return to the rafts to complete the last challenge of the day: tackling as much whitewater as possible from camp to below Casa de Piedra. At take-out, cold beers and tea are waiting our triumphant day of exploration on the Fu. For the evening's festivities, our neighbors, Rolando and Nelli, will prepare a typical Chilean asado of lamb roasted over a bed of coals, salad, potatoes and fresh-baked bread. Under a starry sky, the group, guides and crew spend one last night together on the banks of the majestic Futaleufu. (B,L,D) 
**Please note that this is a suggested itinerary that can be adjusted based on river flows and traveler interests. There are ample activities from base camp to choose from!**

Day 9 FUTALEUFU – BARIILOCHE – BUENOS AIRES

In the morning, our van will take you back to Bariloche for your mid-day flight back to the real world of Buenos Aires, upon arrival transfer to your hotel. The rest of the early evening is free on your own to explore this amazing city. (B)

Day 10 BUENOS AIRES - HOME

Free day for you to enjoy Buenos Aires on your own. At the appropriate time, transfer to the International Airport for your return flight home, marking the end of Southern Explorations services. (B)

**Please note that this is a suggested itinerary that can be adjusted based on river flows and traveler interests. There are ample activities from base camp to choose from including horseback riding, inflatable kayaking, fly-fishing, mountain biking, or repeating one of the more relaxing, less intense rafting days. We can also arrange special instruction for those interested in trying their hand at whitewater kayaking.**

Futaleufu MultiSport

Pricing
Per Person
$3,695

Domestic Airfare:
$650 Airfare (Buenos Aires/Bariloche/Buenos Aires) – subject to change


Contact us for single supplement.
A single supplement is the additional cost of a single traveler not sharing a room in double occupancy.

Trip Dates
Can’t find a date that works for you in the list below? Southern Explorations can arrange a private departure on any date that works with your schedule. Custom tours are also available. Contact us for details.
Wednesday, December 9, 2015 to Friday, December 18, 2015
Available
Friday, January 8, 2016 to Sunday, January 17, 2016
Available
Sunday, January 17, 2016 to Tuesday, January 26, 2016
Available
Friday, January 29, 2016 to Sunday, February 7, 2016
Available
Sunday, February 7, 2016 to Tuesday, February 16, 2016
Available
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 to Thursday, February 25, 2016
Available
Saturday, February 27, 2016 to Monday, March 7, 2016
Available
Monday, March 7, 2016 to Wednesday, March 16, 2016
Available
Thursday, March 17, 2016 to Saturday, March 26, 2016
Available
Included in tour cost
  • Mountain biking gear
  • Rafting equipment
  • Yoga mat
  • All airport/hotel transfers
  • All hotel accommodations
  • All listed activities
  • English-speaking certified guides
  • Entrance fees for all scheduled tours, national parks & archaeological sites
  • Meals as indicated
  • Southern Explorations pre-departure services
Excluded from tour cost
  • Airport taxes, international and local
  • Domestic airfare within South America
  • International airfare to and from Central & South America
  • Tips and gratuities
  • Medical & travel insurance (highly recommended)
  • Hiking boots and other necessary sports gear
  • Reciprocity fee

One Day

Multi-Day

The Southern Explorations team did a fantastic job helping us plan our Galapagos adventure in 2011 and our Torres del Paine/Australis Magellan Straits cruise 2015. They were extremely helpful in planning our trips and quickly responded to each of our questions. We will definitely seek their services to assist in any future travels.   - Sharon McRae (Torres del Paine/Galapagos)


Luxury Patagonia exceeded our every expectation. The arrangements, the accommodations, the guides, the food as well as every location visited were as close to perfect as one could hope. The care and assistance from Southern Explorations prior to our departure was meticulous and informative. We will never forget this trip – one of the best in our lives.   - Rosemary and Geoff Pierson, Massachusetts (Patagonia)


From arrival to departure this trip, from an organizational stand point, felt like a ballet… seamless and fluid. We couldn’t have done it without you – Thanks Southern Explorations!   - Lori Schrader, New York (Patagonia)


Southern Explorations created an amazing custom trip to one of the most beautiful places on earth. They worked with us to fine tune the details of what our perfect vacation to Patagonia would be. The reservations, the accommodations, the transfers and the guides were spot on, very informative and professional. Will we use Southern Explorations for our next trip to the southern hemisphere? You can be certain of that.   - Jim Balsitis and Kathy Kalp (Patagonia)


Thank you for a wonderful introduction to South America and excellent vacation. We will be returning to other SA venues in the coming years and will be sure to contact Southern Explorations for assistance.   - Gordon McPhee, South Carolina (Chile & Argentina)


Our words to describe our trip are Spectacular, Exciting, and Remote! We got to see basically everything we had hoped for, and more!   -Ann Huston, California (Patagonia)


Sadly, I am back from my AMAZING trip to S. America. I just wanted to thank you for everything. Your professionalism, responsiveness, & knowledge of S. America were incredible. I truly had the trip of a lifetime thanks to Southern Explorations. You guys left no stone unturned from the Galapagos, to Peru, to Chile, to Patagonia..............my expectations were exceeded 10-fold. I already recommended you guys to the gentleman on the plane next to me. It was really nice to get to meet Justin in Patagonia. It is obvious how hard he has worked to establish such strong contacts, guides, etc. I could tell that our guides were a step above the rest. I just wanted to thank you for making my dream come true. My mom & I will never forget this the rest of our lives.   - Ami Jampolis (Galapagos Island Cruise, Peru, Chile & Patagonia)

This Trip is Rated: Difficult

Our difficult trips may involve hiking over uneven terrain, with some hikes including significant elevation gain or loss and at higher elevations (up to 12,000 ft). Itineraries may include three to six hour hikes and other activities such as horseback riding, mountain bicycling, rafting and kayaking, which require no previous experience. On many trips, passengers may elect to skip a day's activity, depending on logistics.

How We Rate Our Trips

Easy: Our easy tours generally require fairly little exertion. Each day will involve walking, sightseeing and general travel-related activities such as getting in/out of vans, planes, boats, and zodiacs.

Moderate: Our moderate trips require an average level of fitness. Itineraries may include walks or short hikes of up to two to three hours with little elevation gain, sustained walking at higher altitudes, and/or other similar level physical activities. Many activities are optional.

Difficult: Our difficult trips may involve hiking over uneven terrain, with some hikes including significant elevation gain or loss and at higher elevations (up to 12,000 ft). Itineraries may include three to six hour hikes and other activities such as horseback riding, mountain bicycling, rafting and kayaking, which require no previous experience. On many trips, passengers may elect to skip a day's activity, depending on logistics.

Most Difficult: Our most difficult expeditions are for the adventurer who is in good physical condition. Itineraries may involve multi-day hiking and trekking excursions over steep, rugged terrain and/or where altitude may exceed 14,000 feet. Many trips include camping in remote areas and/or high altitude sites in varying temperature and weather conditions. Trips may also involve many days of demanding Class IV-V rapids, longer sea kayaking trips, horseback riding, and/or mountain bicycling. Training for the physical demands of these tours is highly encouraged. 

Contact Us